Knitting Help – German Short Rows


[music] in this video i’m going to demonstrate german
short rows. i’m going to demonstrate it in a couple of
different ways. first, straight up german short rows, and
then i’ll also show you how to substitute german short rows for regular wraps and turns
in socks. because it ends up being a little bit different. and i’ve had so many requests for this! i’m guessing that a pattern must have come
out recently, a popular pattern that uses german short rows. because i’ve just had so many requests for
it kind of all in the same week. i wasn’t familiar with it. i learned this technique so that i can show
it to you, and it’s kind of strange, because it seems like cheating! [laughs] short rows should be harder than this! i’m not entirely sure why it works, but it
works, and it looks really good, and it might change the face of workign short rows from
here on out. talk is cheap. let’s go ahead and take a look. here’s a little piece that i’ve worked with
just straight flat knitting with german short rows in it. i should mention this piece is not blocked,
and it still looks so good. you can see somethign going on here with the
tension, but really all that’s going to block out once i get this piece wet and wash it. and here is the back. this little bit here is where i wove in the
end. this looks really good. like i said, i don’t know why it works [laughs]. but it works! okay, let me demonstrate. this is just a plain piece of knitting. i’m goign to show you how to work german short
rows on both the front and back of the work. the right and wrong sides. if you’re substituting these in a pattern,
that normally calls fro wraps and turns, if the pattern says “knit 8, wrap and turn”,
you want to knit 9. this is actually going to be the stitch that
ends up being the german short row. let me say this again. so i worked up to the stitch that would normally
require the wrap. turn the work. my working yarn is in front, i am on the wrong
side so that seems right. i’m going to slip that stitch from the left
needle to the right. and this is the unique part of this. i’m going to pull up on that stitch, where
the working yarn is attached, and it gives me two stitches. and this is funny, because this is something
that i would normally do ever do, because beginning knitters do this all the time and
they end up increasing their work. but this is how this works! you pull up, you give yourself two loops where
there was one stitch, and then yarn forward to purl across this row. and again, if the pattern says “purl 8, wrap
and turn”, you’ll want to purl 9. you want to be right on the stitch that requires
the wrap and turn. so i worked up to the stitch where i would
normally put the wrap and turn, but it’s going to be a german short row. i turn the work. i pull the yarn forward between the two needles. slip that stitch from the left to the right. and then pull up on that stitch again. it looks a little different on this side. but it still works. then i’m going to knit across to the next
spot. i’ll show you this one more time, then i’ll
show you how to pick up the wraps. [laughs] pick up the wraps is in quotation
marks. because we’re not really doing that! knit up to the stitch. turn your work. my working yarn is already in front. i slip that stitch, pull up on it, and then
pull the yarn forward to purl to my next wrap. wrap. turn the work. pull the yarn forward. slip that stitch. pull up on that stitch to make it look wonky. and then knit to the next…next whatever
you’re supposed to be doing, but i’m going to show you how to pick up the wraps. okay. here is the first german short row not-wrap
that i come to. and it’s kind of a double looking funny stitch. i’m going to knit those two together. and that’s it. that is it. i’m going to pick up the rest of them. that’s a regular stitch. here’s another funny double stitch. knit it together. and this one is just two stitches. okay, that was how you – that’s how you pick
up the wraps in german short rows! you knit the two halves together! crazy. see? i tell you, it’s too easy. now i’m going to show you how to do it on
the wrong side. when i come up to the first crazy looking double
stitch, which is right here. i’m going to purl those two together. and that’s a normal stitch. here’s another crazy looking stitch, i’m going
to purl those two together. purl 1. i told you…it’s too easy. look how good that looks. okay, really quickly, i want to show you – first,
compared to a traditional wrap and turn. this is a traditional wrap and turn. on a sock toe. i think it looks good, i think the little
holes look decorative. and this is a german short row substituted
for the same thing. it actually looks more solid because there
are no holes. i’m going to try to get this into position
so i can hold it still! i know i’m wiggling around. okay. this is german short rows, this is wrap and
turn. the german short row looks more solid, and
i can tell you by feeling it, it’s not as bulky as the wrap and turn. the wrap and turns have a purl 3 and knit
3 together when you’re picking up the double wraps, and that’s probably why. okay, i’ll show you. if you’re substituting german short rows for
regular wraps and turns, there is a time when you’re working socks, or the toes of socks,
where the pattern tells you to put a second wrap on the next stitch. and i want to show you what that looks like. i already hvae the double stitches here, i’ve
worked my short rows. i am now at the point of the toe of my sock
where i want to start picking up the wraps. and putting a second wrap on the next stitch. so i’m going to knit those two together. because that’s my first turn. and then i’m going to knit the next two together
as well. turn the work. slip that stitch. and this is the way i would do it in german
short rows for putting a second wrap on the stitch. you just knit that stitch, and do the german
short row technique on that stitch. and it ends up looking good, as you just saw. so here’s my first double stitch. i’ll purl those together. the pattern tells me to wrap the next stitch. i’m just going to purl those together, turn
the work. and do the german short row technique by putting
the yarn in front, slipping that stitch, and yanking up on that stitch. and then working across to the next one. and this is a normal provisional cast on,
toe up pattern, where i’ll keep going one stitch further each time. and putting a second wrap on the next stitch. if’ you’re familiar with this kind of toe,
this is all making a lot of sense. if you’re not, i’ll give you a link to some
of my patterns that use this technique in the video description field below. i hope that answers all of your questions
on german short rows, good luck. [whooshing sounds] [music]

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